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Mar 11 2011

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Best Tweets for Trauma and PTSD Survivors (week ending 03/11/11)

Best Tweets for Trauma and PTSD Survivors is a weekly Friday feature. My selections are entirely subjective, and I know it will never be possible to include every great resource tweeted. But I can try! I’ve personally read all tweeted links, and believe them to be of great value.

Disclaimer: I am in no way responsible for content found on any other website. Stay safe, and don’t follow links if you believe you might be triggered by them. Also, I will not be re-checking links from older Best Tweets posts, and if the site’s archived URL is different from the one I’ve provided here, you may need to do a search on their site.

NEW and REALLY COOL: You can now “like” and “share” this post everywhere with the touch of a button or two at the end of the linked tweets! Feel free to do any or all of that! (And thanks.)

 

 

BT031111 Tiny Boat on Horizon

Photo Credit

@Tamavista “You must live in the present,
launch yourself on every wave,
find your eternity in each moment.” ~ Thoreau

 

Six Standalone Tweets to Ponder

@MindfulWakeup “I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe.” ~ Dalai Lama

@karenkmmonroy “Limitations are a part of the physical world, but they shouldn’t start in your mind.”

@guy_finley “The only thing valuable about any fearful state is seeing how worthless it really is and then just letting it go.”

@themindfulist “Stress may feel like a burst of energy, but it’s not useful energy, it’s scattered and short-term at best. Calm down and focus.”

@JaneBeNimble “Release your words. Fly, be free.”

@ShipsofSong “Be intentional. Be purposeful. Be playful.”

 

Linked Tweets

Earthquake in Japan

 

@google Google Person Finder available after earthquake in Japan to help you get information about loved ones.
[SEO: This links to the English version; if you need the Japanese version, the link is at the top of the page.]

@APAHelpCenter Our thoughts are with those in Japan. Tips on how to manage your distress about the earthquake from afar. (apa.org)
[SEO: I watched and tweeted Japan’s earthquake/tsunami literally all night. The images were unbelievable — and the fact that it was happening live, in real time, had an impact even if you live half a world away. This article offers tips and insights into how to cope with distant — but in your living room and your heart — events.]

@DreamDayWed “Please text REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation to Japan and Pacific tsunami relief. Or go to the donations page for the American Red Cross and designate your donation to Japan relief efforts.”

 

The Rest of the Best

 

@DrJennifer How to Silence Your Mind (via @ssanquist)
[SEO: “Even though I’m able to sink down into the deep quiet within, I, like most everyone, have to work with what the Buddhists call monkey mind or that on-going mental chatter. This chatter is at best our inner attempt to process what is happening in our lives and help us create a life that is full, rich and fulfilling. At its worst it is recycling fears, old interactions with people and simply staying stuck in unprocessed, unintegrated historical material.”]

@natasha_tracy Why Don’t We Want to Shower When We’re Sick (Breaking Bipolar blog)
[SEO: This is achingly honest, and I relate to much of it. “It’s complicated. When I’m in pain I want to put up additional barriers between me and the world. Some subconscious part of me is thinking extra clothes and blankets over my head will save me from my brain. Being naked removes barriers. And I can’t have that. And I’m not exactly sure how to explain it other than to say the water is painful. It feels like an attack. It feels like I’m in so much pain already that a breeze grazing my skin makes me want to cry.” Discussion continues in the comments.]

@psychcentral Who’s your worst enemy? If you guessed yourself, you’re right. Want to transform that enemy into a friend?
[SEO: Discusses book “My Mind Is Not Always My Friend” by Steven J. Fogel, in which he outlines how as children we are emotionally free until something happens that we experience as emotional trauma — which begins patterns of withdrawal and suppression. “True growth starts when we realize that our actions are being triggered by an event that activates old patterns of behavior and we begin to understand which old patterns are being triggered by which particular external catalysts. The key is mindfulness–the mind’s ability to stay conscious–so that we can be aware of how and when our machinery gets triggered. This means that we have to see and understand the ways our machinery reacted to past traumas and the programming that formed at that time, which is still with us.” Be sure to also see the next post below.]

@DrBeckerSchutte Are You, Your Own Best Friend? (via @Esdeer)
[SEO: “I now know that people will come and go from my life. Some will support, some won’t be able to or choose not to. I now know that some experiences and events in my life will change me forever. I now know that out of it all I remain a constant presence, in the midst of it all. I now know that self-compassion is the greatest gift I can give myself, at any time in my life, but especially when I am grieving. I also know that only I can make myself a priority in my life.” Includes a list of 30 practical ideas to begin being your own best friend.]

@healthyplace Dissociation and Depression: An Unholy Matrimony (Dissociative Living blog) (via @SurvivorNetwork)
[SEO: “Dissociation and depression are perfectly suited for each other — the former specializes in carrying you when you cannot cope, and the latter specializes in convincing you of your inability to cope. It’s a match made in mental illness heaven and, if you have Dissociative Identity Disorder, a difficult partnership to dissolve. … It’s difficult to recognize the voice of depression before dissociation casts it’s spell, but I suspect if I could do that I might be able to remember that I’m depressed long enough to do something about it.”]

@SarahEOlson2009 Your Right To See Your Patient Records (via Therapy Soup blog)
[SEO: “If you are a therapy patient, you need to know: You have the right to see many, if not most, of your clinical records, at any point in time. There is a pesky “however”: However, you generally do not have the right to see the therapist’s personal notes that are written during and sometimes after, your therapy session (you have to check with your own state’s regulations).”]

@healthyplace I Hate Anxiety! The Physiology of Stress (via Treating Anxiety blog)
[SEO: “The stress of an anxiety disorder can twist the fabric of life; I can’t see it the same way as I did before my “nervous condition” set in. This isn’t stage-fright, or make believe. It’s not masterpiece theatre. I did not get PTSD from watching too many Twilight Zone episodes.”]

@MichelePTSD PTSD Doesn’t Heal Itself: Deciding to Seek Help
[SEO: “There’s a lot to consider when we realize we cannot heal alone. But that’s OK, skepticism and apprehension are healthy and part of the healing process. We need to develop a reconnection to ourselves, our thought processes, our decision-making skills and all the other reactions and fears being a strong, proactive person brings up. More importantly: We do need help. There’s no denying it, we cannot heal alone in an oasis of fear and a mind that is stuck on the wrong backward track. In order to conquer the past and create the future we desperately need someone who can help us find and read the right map.”]

@goodthingz How to Be Bold In Life — 7 Great Tips
[SEO: Discusses how to proactively approach and face your anxiety in ways which become your choice — rather than allowing your anxiety to control you. One example: “3. Work on Your Beliefs. You are probably fearful because you believe that you can’t. However, if you believe that you can’t, then it becomes a self fulfilling prophecy. But what if you believe the opposite? What if you program yourself to take on new beliefs? Since beliefs are made from thoughts, it is possible to change your thoughts to make new beliefs.”]

 

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Permanent link to this article: http://thirdofalifetime.com/2011/03/11/best-tweets-for-trauma-and-ptsd-survivors-week-ending-031111/

2 pings

  1. Little News » Blog Archive » Ptsd

    […] Best Tweets for Trauma and PTSD Survivors (week ending 03/11/11 …: Best Tweets for Trauma and PTSD Survivors is a weekly Friday feature. My selections are entirely subjective, and I know it will never be possible to include every great resource tweeted. But I can try! I?ve personally read all tweeted links, and believe them to be of great value. Disclaimer: I am in no way … – Readmore […]

  2. Daily News » Blog Archive » Ptsd

    […] Best Tweets for Trauma and PTSD Survivors (week ending 03/11/11 …: Best Tweets for Trauma and PTSD Survivors is a weekly Friday feature. My selections are entirely subjective, and I know it will never be possible to include every great resource tweeted. But I can try! I?ve personally read all tweeted links, and believe them to be of great value. Disclaimer: I am in no way … – Readmore […]

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